What are the Most Common Plumbing Issues?

Every homeowner will eventually face a plumbing issue. Whether it’s a clogged sink or a burst pipe, plumbing problems can be both costly and time-consuming to fix. To help you avoid these issues, here is a list of the most common plumbing problems and how to fix them.

Fixing Running Toilets

A running toilet can waste up to 200 gallons of water every day, making it one of the most common plumbing problems homeowners face. Luckily, this is also one of the most straightforward issues to fix. All you need to do is replace the flapper or fill valve inside your tank. If replacing these parts doesn’t work, it might be time for a complete repair kit. Hiring a professional Plumber In Euless Texas is a good idea for complicated or severe problems.

Repairing Leaking Faucets

Leaking faucets are another common problem that’s relatively easy to fix on your own if you have some basic knowledge of how your water system works. The first thing you should check for is an old wet washer inside the handle or stem – these typically wear out after a certain amount of use. If that’s not the case, then you might have a more complicated problem, so it is generally wise to call Plumber Bedford TX for help at this point.

Bathtub Draining Slowly

This is another widespread problem, and if you have a “P-trap” installed under your bathtub or sink, you may be able to fix this yourself without calling a plumber! The P stands for “p-traps,” and what you need to do is remove the trap from beneath your drain and clean it out by flushing water through it until all debris has come loose and cleared out. Now reattach the p-trap and test to see if it works better – if not, try removing other parts of the plumbing under the bathtub one by one until you find out where the clog is.

Water Not Draining in Toilet or Tub

If water does not drain in your toilet, it may be time to call a plumber. If you have an older home, roots from nearby plants may have made their way into your sewer system, and this will require that these roots are dug up and removed before your plumbing system can work properly again. A plumber should be able to remove any built-up debris with relative ease; however, if you do feel like trying yourself, be careful since some of these tools can cause damage to pipes or bathrooms! If you use chemicals, make sure they are environmentally safe, so they don’t damage your pipes or the environment.

If you have a slow draining tub, it can be caused by a buildup of soap scum and grime in the drain. It would help if you poured some bleach down the drain while running boiling water to help clear out any blockages. If this doesn’t work, try using an enzyme-based cleaner (available at home improvement stores) and follow instructions carefully. The manufacturers will even tell you if their product is safe for septic systems! You may need to hire a plumber if these chemicals do not work since other issues such as tree roots growing into sewer lines may be present.

Water Heater Issues

You turn on your shower only to find that there’s no hot water? A lot of things can be happening here. The easiest way to tell the problem would be to listen carefully to figure out if your water heater is making any noise. A few common issues cause your water heater not to produce hot water.

– Dirty or cracked elements. If you have an electric water heater, these can become dirty over time by sediment in the tank and will need replacing every five years depending on usage. 

– Thermostats. If you have a water heater with two elements, there are usually two thermostats in the tank. These need to be replaced when they stop working or if one side won’t heat up even though the breaker is on. 

– Pilot light out. Relight by turning off all of the controls to the unit, lighting a match to the door where your thermocouple is located, and then turning everything back on 5 minutes later once everything starts heating up again.

If none of these common issues apply, then shut off the power to your water heater, drain some water from it (about 50% or so), and then turn the power back on. Make sure that you’ve let the water heater sit for at least an hour before continuing to use it.

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